Upcoming Events

Saturday, 21 Oct 2017 - Sunday, 22 Oct 2017
Time: 13:00 - 9:00
Location: Ocean Racing Club of Victoria

Saturday, 4 Nov 2017
Time: 2:00 - 23:00
Location: Queenscliff

Sunday, 12 Nov 2017
Time: 08:45 am - 11:55 am
Location: The Heads, Port Phillip Bay

Saturday, 18 Nov 2017 - Sunday, 19 Nov 2017
Time: 08:15 am - 05:00 pm
Location: Wesley College

Sunday, 19 Nov 2017
Time: 08:15 am - 05:00 pm
Location: Wesley College

Saturday, 25 Nov 2017
Time: 07:00 am - 02:00 pm
Location: Queenscliff

Sunday, 26 Nov 2017
Time: 09:00 am - 05:00 pm
Location: Queenscliff

Tuesday, 26 Dec 2017
Time: 10:30 - 17:00
Location: Station Pier

Safety is our focus, safety related news articles are shown below.

Safety is embraced and encouraged before and during sailing events.  It is fundamental to our training, our racing and culture.

 

ORCV Safety and Training


It's all about hiking.


In our third piece from Andrew Verdon, who is the Australian Sailing Team (AIS Squad) fitness coordinator, he is going to provide us with some information on how to prepare your body, hike like never before and then recover from a hard day's sailing.

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Click HERE to download Andrew's marvellous article on keelboat hiking.

 

Andrew would also like to thank Mike Dunstan, Andrew Palfrey and the Rolex Farr 40 World Championships for the photos.

 

If you liked this, you can also Andrew's first piece - How fit are you for sailing? There is also Andrew's second piece for you, too - The physical demands of offshore sailing.

 

Text by Andrew Verdon

Dip. Ex Sci

Grad Dip App Sci

Cert IV Fitness

Level One Strength Coach-ASCA

B.Comm


Mobile  0419 690 121

Email 1 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

PO Box 1552 Neutral Bay NSW 2089 Australia

Fax: 61 2 9908 4211

Skype andrew.verdon

Suite 3 Rear 19 Young St Neutral Bay NSW 2089 Australia

Entry via: 1 Cooper Lane

 

Andrew is currently completing his Masters Degree in exercise and has been the Australian Sailing Team (AIS Squad) fitness coordinator since 2003, including the 2004 and 2008 Olympic Sailing Teams. Should you have any questions? Feel free to contact him atThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and if you're in Sydney, make an appointment to see him in person.

 


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ORCV Safety and Training


Tech Heads rejoice!


(There's lots of 'new's in the weather.)


We've had plenty of petrol head references here on the site, so it is with great pleasure that we look at some very cool new gear from the BoM.

Malcolm Riley, the Media and Community Relations Manager from the Bureau of Meteorology had this to say about some of the plethora of new items the BoM site. "A period of change began in the Bureau of Meteorology with the introduction of the Next Generation Forecasting system in Victoria in 2008. This system is not fully rolled out in Victoria to date, with the marine graphics pages still to come. There are also many other changes 'in the pipeline', like the introduction of the Next Generation Forecasting system to other States (NSW September '10), new radars and radar upgrades, release of Access forecast model and associated information, are just a few of the things we can look forward to."

"Apart from new 'things' (equipment and systems), the Bureau of Meteorology also maintains a research and training arm that continuously advances the Bureau's understanding of the weather and climate. One of their key roles is to design and change the systems that are used by the forecasters, so as to more accurately predict weather conditions."

"All I can say is, watch this space. To quote the Bureau's Director, it's all about More and Better", said Malcolm.

One of our resident tech heads, Neville 'Nifty' Rose, was also suitably impressed with the changes that appeared very recently at bom.gov.au. "I agree - noticed a change earlier this week. Some of the new charts are great!" These are two things that particularly got his attention:

  • New style charts for Waves, Wind Speed & Direction, Temperature
  • New PDF printable colour chart Mean Sea Level Pressure Chart (MSLP).

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You will also want to note that there are new Ocean Warning Zones and a new model, called Access, that will be generating information. The other new item, especially important as boats go up and down the East Coast at this time of year, is that NSW will now look like the Victorian site, as of September. As mentioned, there are new chart styles and a new buoy way down in the Southern Ocean. We have put the BoM's August Newsletter up so everyone can download it, right HERE.

You can also read how the BoM describes their changes to the services they provide, HERE. The new maps, that really are something else, are available from HERE.

The main thing is that there many new things available on the site to make your understanding of current and predicted weather more vast and easier to comprehend. Best you spend time wandering through the pages and if you need assistance, let us know and we'll put you in touch with the correct persons at the BoM. If you see something that you think should be featured, then let us know and we'll run it. We'd like to take this opportunity to thank the BoM for their help, information and assistance.

 

 

By John Curnow

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ORCV Safety and Training


The physical demands of offshore sailing.


In our second piece from Andrew Verdon, who is the Australian Sailing Team (AIS Squad) fitness coordinator, he is going to provide us with some information on how to train for offshore events. Andrew is currently completing his Masters Degree in exercise and has been the Australian Sailing Team (AIS Squad) fitness coordinator since 2003, including the 2004 and 2008 Olympic Sailing Teams. Should you have any questions? Feel free to contact him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and if you're in Sydney, make an appointment to see him in person.

Racing yachts offshore is one of the most demanding physical activities you can undertake. It is classed in the same category of extreme endurance activities as mountain climbing. Going offshore is a harsh environment, as it's often cold, wet, dark, noisy and puts a large amount of physical stress on the body, while asking for extended concentration and endurance, so as to improve the performance of the boat. Two of the most demanding positions (that impact directly on boat speed) are the driver and the trimmers. If concentration is reduced in these two critical positions, then the boat speed may drop by tenths of a knot and this could be enough to lose time for line honours or a handicap result/decision.

What is the best way to prepare the body (and mind) for this? The obvious answer is to get time in on the water before the race. But what can you do on your own, outside of sailing? There are three main areas you need to work on:

Whole body strength

Follow a program that includes the upper and lower body. Upper body pushing and pulling exercises are an obvious choice, but you need to include lower body exercises in the programs. Exercises like squats, lunges, deadlifts will strengthen the legs and trunk. Avoid machines and work all areas with free weights - dumbbells and barbells, to help the stability in the core and the joints.

High intensity cardio

Offshore races have long periods of inactivity, then short bursts of intense action. Sail changes are a good example. The best way to prepare the body for this, is interval style cardio workouts. Interval just means you work then rest, over repeated cycles and in a structured workout. The best gym machine for this would be the rower, as it recruits the whole body, just as sailing does.

Swimming would be another good option outside the gym and boxing would be a good class option. Running would be a less desirable option.

Stretching

Flexibility is crucial for good performance and to allow the body to work in strong, stable and safe positions. It is left out of many programs, but is vital to prevent injuries. Aim to complete 15-20 mins of full body stretching, twice across a whole week. It can be done as part of a workout or separately. I get many clients to include 10-15 mins in front of the TV each night, to de-load the body at the end of the day and help them prepare for a good quality sleep.

My offshore experience is limited, so I went to the experts to see what they had to say on the topic, from their own personal experiences and over many miles sailed all around the world. For mainsail trim, I went to Michael Dunstan, who has been completing the East coast racing circuit on the TP52, Wot Yot. For headsail trim, I spoke with Alby Pratt of North Sails, who has won three Hobart’s on Wild Oats XI. Finally, I caught up with Chris Nicholson, who finished second in the Volvo Ocean Race aboard Puma Racing, to talk about helming.

I asked each of them what advice they could provide to help with the physical demands of sailing offshore. Mike and Alby answered it from a perspective of your own body's demands, while Chris suggests some equipment, clothing and nutrition areas to focus on.

Trimming the mainsail during offshore races: Michael Dunstan

The obvious muscle groups are the arms and shoulders. Turning a winch, working the traveller, pumping the mainsheet downwind, pumping a backstay ram. Probably the forgotten muscle group is your core. Top handling a winch, I believe a lot of power and speed comes from your core strength. Your core also is working constantly keeping you stable and balanced, as the boat goes up and down waves whilst travelling upwind.

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Michael also sail Etchells with Julian Plante aboard North Star. Image courtesy of Sail-World.

Trimming headsails and spinnakers: Alby Pratt

The most important thing is good core strength and stability, as you are sitting for long periods without any support, on something that is constantly moving and hanging onto a rope, which is sometimes reasonably loaded.

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Image of WO XI courtesy of Wild Oats. Alby was also recently aboard another RP penned and McConaghy built vessel, LOKI, the Sydney Gold Coast winner 2010.

Driving during offshore races: Chris Nicholson

Without a doubt, the set up of the rim load on the wheel and the balance of the boat, is key to the performance of both the boat and the driver. Obviously, this will pretty much prevent most injuries and allow the driver to perform better and for longer.

The other thing is to drive for shorter periods of time. One and a half hours is more than enough time behind the wheel and you also need to do the usual things of eating and drinking enough. Comfortable boots or shoes with good inner sole are vital to stop getting a sore back or knees.

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Chris (Nicko) is famous for a lot of things, from 18s to being a Watch Captain on Puma, and now Skipper of ETNZ/Camper in the next Volvo Ocean Race (image of the announcement with Kevin Shoebridge is © Richard Gladwell).

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The everyday workingman’s plan for offshore race prep

Let’s look at a case study of a male preparing for an offshore race of three days or longer. He works full time, has a wife and kids at home and sails one day on the weekend on the yacht and not a lot of spare time. This is what I would recommend as a basic weekly plan:

2 x 20 minutes of strength training over the full body

2 x 20 minutes intense cardio work completed in interval style

3 x 20 minutes of trunk strength / flexibility

This can be combined into a 60 minutes workout or kept separate and done each day, for 20 minutes per day.

 

If you liked this, you can also Andrew's first piece - How fit are you for sailing?

 

Text by Andrew Verdon

Dip. Ex Sci

Grad Dip App Sci

Cert IV Fitness

Level One Strength Coach-ASCA

B.Comm


Mobile  0419 690 121

Email 1 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

PO Box 1552 Neutral Bay NSW 2089 Australia

Fax: 61 2 9908 4211

Skype andrew.verdon

Suite 3 Rear 19 Young St Neutral Bay NSW 2089 Australia

Entry via: 1 Cooper Lane



Captions and layout by John Curnow

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ORCV Safety and Training


How fit are you for sailing?


Often we forget that we are just as integral component of the boat as the rigging, which gets Xrayed and the hull, which gets anti-fouled annually. Andrew Verdon is the Australian Sailing Team (AIS Squad) fitness coordinator and he is going to provide us with some information regularly, so as to look after ourselves better. Andrew is currently completing his Masters Degree in exercise and has been the Australian Sailing Team (AIS Squad) fitness coordinator since 2003, including the 2004 and 2008 Olympic Sailing Teams. Should you have any questions? Feel free to contact him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and if you're in Sydney, make an appointment to see him in person.

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We do a lot of maintenance on the boats and gear, but what about the most important component - you? Pic © Steb Fisher.

The off-season is a great time to think about what can be improved for next season. As well as checks and changes to the hull or rig or a new sail design and cut, we should also think about your body.

As part of the off-season steps for all the sailors I work with one on one, I get them to have a check in with a sports physiotherapist, to identify any potential weak areas that could either get injured or limit their performance. These then help to show the sailor what areas of their exercise programs to invest their time into.

Some very interesting and sailing specific research was published last year in the Sports Medicine Journal. The authors conducted a literature review of sailing related injuries, from published research over the last 28 years.

They summarised their finding into four relevant areas for us: Olympic class, recreational, America’s Cup and offshore sailing. The following injury rates were discovered:

Category

Injury rate
Olympic Class Sailing 0.2 injuries per athlete per year
Recreational Sailing 0.3-0.4 injuries per person per year
America’s Cup Sailing 2.2 injures per 1000 hours of sailing
Offshore Sailing 1.5 per person per event for amateurs
Offshore Sailing 3.2 per person per event for professionals

In Olympic class sailing, they found that the spines and knees were the most common injury sites. As elite sailors prepared for the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games, they discovered that lower back (45%) then knees (22%) and shoulders (18%) combined to be 80% of all the injuries. Another evaluation before the 2004 Athens Olympic Games found that 94% of reported injuries were to the spine or knee. Poor hiking technique and inadequate core and trunk strength, combined with high training loads, led to these injures. Other areas that could be at risk were neck and arms.

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We put ourselves through a lot out there - we need to be in shape.

In recreational sailors, the most common injuries were acute in nature, as a result of impacts, especially in heavy-wind sailing. These were all caused by slips, falls, impacts and cuts or abrasions, whilst onboard the vessel.

In the Americas Cup domain, the bow team, including bowman, foredeck and mastman, were the most commonly inured on the water. Grinders were at the greatest risk in their fitness training, due to high training levels and intensities. Many activities whilst onboard can expose the lower back to injury, due to the high loads and prolonged strain.

Offshore sailors were separated into amateurs and professionals and the information gathered from the various round the world races was analysed.

Helmsman often experienced upper limb (arm and shoulder) overuse injuries from steering and the foredeck team are at risk of acute impact injuries. Illness and related complaints accounted for a large proportion of medical situations in these events.

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All positions on the boat can cause you harm. Image © Steb Fisher.

The authors concluded, “Sailors of all classes and abilities are at risk of injury. Highly repetitive activities such as hiking, grinding, pumping and steering account for most of these, but acute impacts can cause injury as well. Sailing has seen a progressive elevation in the standard of competition, a rise in professionalism at the elite levels and higher physical demands placed upon sailors.”

So apart from wearing the correct clothing (gloves, knee pads, good quality shoes etc), to minimise the chances of impact injuries, what can we do about the overuse injuries? Simple! If you are going to use a particular part of your body on the water, then get it stronger! Use your local sports physiotherapist or osteopath to help with this. Get them to review where you are at before the season starts and strengthen any weak areas they identify, with a structured strength program. The work capacity of the region of the body at high risk of injury can be improved greatly with strength training. They also suggest incorporating stretching exercises into a training program to ensure good posture and flexibility.

The authors also suggest that sailing and training should be monitored at these higher levels and the intensity and volume be managed, to help with recovery times and avoiding unnecessary fatigue. Nutrition and hydration should also be considered, to prevent fatigue on the water, as this could increase the risk of getting injured.

Summary table of areas to be strengthened:

Category

Areas to strengthen
Olympic Class Sailing Shoulder, spine, core and lower body
Recreational Sailing Balance and core, shoulder, spine
America’s Cup Sailing Arms, spine, shoulders, core
Offshore Sailing Lower body, trunk, arms and shoulders


Text by Andrew Verdon

Dip. Ex Sci

Grad Dip App Sci

Cert IV Fitness

Level One Strength Coach-ASCA

B.Comm


Mobile  0419 690 121

Email 1 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

PO Box 1552 Neutral Bay NSW 2089 Australia

Fax: 61 2 9908 4211

Skype andrew.verdon

Suite 3 Rear 19 Young St Neutral Bay NSW 2089 Australia

Entry via: 1 Cooper Lane



Captions and layout by John Curnow

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VeloceBowman

M2V, M2O and AAORR and beyond - final session 08/06/10.


Long Distance Offshore Sailing Seminars


The first of the 2010 Long Distance Training and Information Seminars was held at RBYC on February 9, 2010, from 1900hrs. They are purposely designed for things like the acronyms in the headline, which are Melbourne to Vanuatu, Melbourne to Osaka and Bob 'Freight Train' Williams' Around Australia Ocean Race and Rally, as well as any country hopping and South Pacific cruising forays you may be planning.

These will be similar in content and format to the ones held for the 2006 M2V race, but the ORCV will be updating and reviewing all material, so please ensure you are there. Any questions to Sally or Dennis in the office on 03 9689 1622.

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Click HERE to go and read the long Distance Offshore Sailing Seminar course notes now and remember, it's all free, but the information is PRICELESS!!!!

 

You may also like to check out the information contained in the links below:

 

Click HERE to read about Stability for Cat1, which all entrants, both ccruiser and racer, will need to comply with.

 

Click HERE to read about First Aid kits.

 

Click HERE to read about EPIRBS and PLBs.

 

Finally then, click HERE to read about all the ORCV Training and Education opportunities.

 

Soon enough there will be new Sea Safety and Survival Certificate courses, Rip Tours, First Aid Level 2/Senior course, Weather course and Radio certificate, so please keep a weather eye, here at orcv.org.au. Any questions or to reserve a place for these sell-out events (which really does help to plan sizes, venues etc), please call Sally or Dennis in the office on 03 9689 1622.

 

 

By John Curnow


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